Women's Rights & Movements in IranKazemi was tortured, Iranian doctor says

Kazemi was tortured, Iranian doctor says

-

CBC News: Canadian photojournalist Zahra Kazemi showed signs of being savagely beaten when she was brought to a Tehran hospital in 2003, said an emergency room doctor on duty at the time. Shahram Azam, a former staff physician in Iran’s defence ministry, said he examined Kazemi, 54, early on June 27, 2003, according to reports published in the Globe and Mail and Montreal’s La Presse. CBC News

MONTREAL – Canadian photojournalist Zahra Kazemi showed signs of being savagely beaten when she was brought to a Tehran hospital in 2003, said an emergency room doctor on duty at the time.

Shahram Azam, a former staff physician in Iran’s defence ministry, said he examined Kazemi, 54, early on June 27, 2003, according to reports published in the Globe and Mail and Montreal’s La Presse.

Azam, who recently received political asylum in Canada, intends to tell his story at a news conference in Ottawa on Thursday.

Kazemi, an Iranian-born Montrealer, had been arrested while photographing a demonstration outside Tehran’s Evin prison. She died in Iranian custody in July 2003. Iran’s government admitted she’d been beaten, but maintains her death was accidental. An Iranian security agent was charged and acquitted of killing her.

According to Azam, who now lives in Canada, Kazemi’s entire body had strange markings all over it.

Azam described massive bruising around her head and ears. Her skull had been fractured and her nose was broken. Two fingers were also broken, and were missing fingernails.

Kazemi also had severe abdominal bruising and showed evidence of being flogged on the legs. There were also signs of a “very brutal rape,” according to the doctor.

Azam fled Iran last August, going first to Finland, then Sweden, before contacting Kazemi’s son, Stephan Hachemi. With the help of Canadian lawyers, Hachemi helped Azam and his family get to Canada.

This month, Azam received landed-immigrant status as a refugee sponsored by the Canadian government.

Azam told the Globe he wants to refocus worldwide attention on Kazemi’s case. He hopes it will ultimately lead to the “indictment” of Iran’s Islamic Republic.

Latest news

Iran’s 2023 Budget Shrouded In Doubt

On January 22, the Majlis (parliament) approved the draft of the 2023 budget bill proposed by regime president Ebrahim...

Iran: People of Khoy Still Reeling From 5.9-Magnitude Earthquake

An earthquake with a magnitude of 5.9 struck northwest Iran on Saturday, killing at least three people and injuring...

Iran’s Unsolvable Air Pollution Problem

Air pollution will remain at dangerous levels and will increase for the next few days in most big cities,...

The World Must Acknowledge the Iranian People’s Right to Self-defense

Victor Hugo once said: “When dictatorship is a fact, revolution becomes a right.” Throughout history, this has been the...

Iran: 60% Of Population Is Poor

The livelihood baskets of the Iranian people are shrinking dramatically. This, in turn, has introduced new concerns to protect...

The implications of EU’s terrorist designation of the Revolutionary Guards (IRGC)

The European Parliament called on January 18 for the European Union to list Iran's Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) as a...

Must read

US hits Iran airline with sanctions after murder plot

AFP: The US Treasury Department on Wednesday hit Iran's...

Rice raises new doubts about Iran’s nuclear program

AP: Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice raised fresh doubts...

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you