OpinionIran in the World PressIran's nuclear threat

Iran’s nuclear threat

-

Miami Herald – Editorial: A round of talks that began Friday between Iranian diplomats and European officials represents the last chance to head off an escalating confrontation over that country’s nuclear-weapons program. The heart of the problem lies in Iran’s denial that it has such a program and Secretary of State Colin Powell’s unequivocal affirmation to the contrary. Miami Herald

Editorial

OUR OPINION: CURRENT TALKS ARE LAST CHANCE TO STAVE OFF U.N. SANCTIONS

A round of talks that began Friday between Iranian diplomats and European officials represents the last chance to head off an escalating confrontation over that country’s nuclear-weapons program.

The heart of the problem lies in Iran’s denial that it has such a program and Secretary of State Colin Powell’s unequivocal affirmation to the contrary.

He could be wrong, of course — it would not be the first time — but he is surely right in declaring that the international community has the responsibility to apply as much pressure as possible to make Iran comply with rules governing nuclear safeguards.

That hasn’t been the case so far. Time and again, the European allies have balked at U.S. insistence to apply more pressure in the form of sanctions approved by the United Nations. We have generally supported the diplomatic approach, but — to quote Secretary Powell again — “diplomacy does not mean pretending something isn’t there when it’s there.”

Part of the reason that the Iran nuclear issue has continued to fester is the Bush administration’s preoccupation with reelection. This effectively meant postponing all tough decisions, such as what to do about the nuclear challenge posed by both North Korea and Iran. Only two days before the election, the Iranian parliament voted to resume nuclear-enrichment activities, with some members chanting, “Death to America.”

The only progress that has been made so far is to impose a deadline of Nov. 25, by which time an agreement must be reached or Iran will have to face the prospect of U.N.-imposed sanctions. That is not a day too soon because Iran announced in September that it had begun converting its uranium stock into gas, a crucial step in the enrichment process that could lead to weapons production.

There is no easy or simple solution, unless Iran agrees to accept economic inducements in exchange for giving up its enrichment program and agreeing to full inspections.

If Iran won’t accept the carrot, it will be time to consider the alternative.

Latest news

Iran Regime’s Ministry of Culture’s Decision To Eliminate Children’s Intellectual Centers

With the so-called ‘Cultural Revolution’ which took place between 1980 and 1983, the Iranian regime tried to purge the...

Water Shortage Crisis and the Destruction of Iran’s Water Resources

Iran is currently suffering from a number of dangerous natural disasters. One of the most worrying is the drying...

Economic Freedom Under the Rule of the Mullahs in Iran

The Fraser institute published its annual report of the index of economic freedom on September 8, which measured the...

Iran’s Regime Continues Its Internet Restriction Project

This is part of the outlook of a document by the Iranian regime’s Supreme Council of Cyberspace, which has...

Iran’s Human Development Index Dropped Sharply

One of the most common questions asked in primary schools by teachers all over the world is, “wealth or...

Narcotics Iran Regime’s Income Source for Terrorism

Besides Iran’s malign activities, such as its regional interference, and missile and nuclear projects, drug trafficking plays a major...

Must read

Full text of Bush’s speech on Iraq

Iran Focus: London, Jan. 11 - The following is...

Iran detains director Panahi: opposition website

Reuters: Iranian security forces have detained film director Jafar...

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you